by Caroline on Feb 10, 2012 at 10:27 AM

This is the way they're going to get people to drink reprocessed waste water? Really?

“Ten million dogs can’t be wrong.”

I'm liking our chances of continuing to sell bottled water...

As ‘Yuck Factor’ Subsides, Treated Wastewater Flows From Taps

By FELICITY BARRINGER
SAN DIEGO — Almost hidden in the northern hills, the pilot water treatment plant here does not seem a harbinger of revolution. It cost $13 million, uses long-established technologies and produces a million gallons a day.

But the plant’s very existence is a triumph over one of the most stubborn problems facing the nation’s water managers: if they make clean drinking water from wastewater, will the yuck factor keep people from accepting it?

Read More at www.NYTimes.com

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by Breck on Mar 17, 2011 at 2:27 PM

Assuming you think rich, well educated people can afford to drink bottled water more than poor folks (which simply isn't true for the 2nd leading beverage category). This has got to be awfully confusing info for the EWG and Corporate Responsibility International people.

red orbit health websiteNonetheless, this article from Red Orbit reviews the EPICURO national bladder cancer study reports that "well educated people who choose to drink bottled water rather than water from public supplies may be no less exposed to potentially cancer-causing water contaminants."

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by Breck on Mar 4, 2011 at 3:38 PM

This article was on the front page of today's USA Today. Granted it is in Singapore, but still...

My Favorite Quote: "I've seen the process (of purifying the water) and it seems pretty safe," says Samuel Teo, 23. Still, he adds "I like Evian better."

Click here to read this article.

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by Breck on Mar 3, 2011 at 3:28 PM

This article by Teresa Masterson spotlights pollution perils in Philadelphia. Favorite Quote from the article: "That Brita filter may not be enough, people." Would someone please alert the Environmental Working Group and Corporate Accountability International? Their normally compliant media partners are getting off message...

Also note the subtitle of this article "Free tip: Buy bottled water from now." We agree Forbes!

Click here to read this article.

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by Breck on Apr 15, 2010 at 5:26 PM

This is an interesting article about water testing in the Great Lakes that found the presence of nicotine byproducts and cholesterol drugs. The people urging addtional reserch are not left wing eco-radicals. The water sampling was done on the intake pipes of water utilities by the States surrounding the Great Lakes as well as the USGS. A link to the full report is available at the end.

by Amanda Smith-Teutsch

After testing of water in the Great Lakes revealed the presence of nicotine byproducts and cholesterol drugs, a group advocating for the protection of the inland seas is calling for more research into the long-term effects of drugs in drinking water.

The Alliance for The Great Lakes said a recent sampling of Lake Michigan revealed low levels of cotinine, a nicotine byproduct, and the cholesterol-modifying drug gemfibrozil, distributed throughout the water. Also found were substances including heart medications, herbicides, estrogen, antibiotics and pain anti-inflammatory agents.

“Broader use of pharmaceuticals and growing knowledge of the health effects from their chemical byproducts make drug pollution an emerging concern,” said Lyman Welch, Alliance Water Quality Program manager and lead author of the report, Protecting the Great Lakes from Pharmaceutical Pollution. “As we learn more about what dangers these drugs pose, we have to be ready to take precautionary steps to limit the amount that passes into the Great Lakes every day.”

While some experts say the levels are too low to impact human health, Welch said it could take up to 100 years to flush the pollutants out of the Great Lakes waterways. The report points out that some researchers worry human health could be threatened by long-term, low-level exposure to some of the chemicals found in the water, such as hormones and cell-change agents. These compounds are designed to work in the body at low concentrations, the Alliance said.

The U.S. Geological Survey indicated some aquatic wildlife were suffering endocrine changes due to exposure to the pharmaceuticals.

Great-Lakes.pdf

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by Breck on Apr 14, 2010 at 12:43 PM

If this was a bottled water company instead of a public utility, the letter would make the front page of papers across the country!

Apparently 3 x the permissible EPA level of radon in the water is a "negligible risk" and the water is "safe to drink." I am not aware of a point of use filter that's going to take out radium so the Environmental Working Group, the National Resources Defense Council and Corporate Accountability International are going to have to come up with a different solution for those folks seeking to avoid the use of "environmentally irresponsible bottled water."

The FDA has zero tolerance for this type of stuff from bottled water companies. Tap water is regulated to a higher degree than bottled water?! Give me a break...

Click here to view this document in PDF.


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by Breck on Oct 13, 2009 at 5:43 PM

A New York Times article was published yesterday in a series they are running called "Toxic Waters." As anti-bottled water groups continue to make claims about tap water being "just as good" as bottled water, the unintended consequence for them is the re-examination of true quality of tap water. It is likely the continuing education of the American consumer on the quality of tap water will help the bottled water in the long run.

You can read Charles Duhigg's article here on the New York Times site.

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